GROUP EXHIBITIONS

REVIEWING THE PAST
Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery, Montserrat College of Art, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

18 January – 19 March

2022

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Samuel Bak and the Art of Remembrance, the group exhibition, Re-Viewing the Past, highlights the work of artists who explore ideas of history and memory as part of processes of re-writing or re-imagining. Creating in diverse media, including painting, printmaking, animation, and the graphic novel, participating artists consider their connection to history — whether personal or collective — as it resonates with or is interpreted through the present moment and current socio-political and cultural issues.  Artists include Paul Emmanuel, Maya Erdelyi, Dell M. Hamilton, Dave Ortega, and Jordan Seaberry. Scar (2015) and Lesion (2015) were selected by curator Dr. Lynne Cooney for this exhibition.
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CARTOGRAPHIES

OF BECOMING

The Sylt Foundation, Sylt Island, Germany
24 December 2021 – 30 December

2022

Cartographies of Becoming interrogates the ephemeral process of positioning the self, the artist self and the social in response to a world in disintegration. How can we imagine, dream and create new meaning-making through the remembrance, and re-arrangement of perspectives, of memories, of trauma, of experiences? Six artists and their departure from the certainty of our cultural maps of belonging into the ephemeral space of transition. A reprint of the banners from The Lost Men Mozambique (2007) and Rising-falling (2021) were selected by curator Indra Wussow for this exhibition.
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BAG FACTORY 30 YEARS: SO FAR, THE FUTURE
FADA Gallery, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
30 June – 4 July

2020

The Bag Factory is celebrating three decades of our history and legacy as a non-profit contemporary visual arts organisation by looking through our archives and highlighting our unique, long-standing relationship with artists. Initially founded in 1991 by Dr David Koloane, British philanthropist Robert Loder, and arts administrator Sandra Burnett, with support from artists like Kagiso Patrick Mautloa, Sam Nhlengethwa and many others, the Bag Factory is an inclusive and interactive studio space for a cross-generational community of practicing visual artists where the exchange of ideas is encouraged and stimulated. Airstrip (2002) was selected for this exhibition.
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CURE

University of Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa

14 September

2020 –

With levels of lockdown still in place during the COVID-19 Pandemic, The UJ Gallery invites 16 artists to explore and interrogate the aspect of art as cure, as restorative endeavour. The exhibition focuses on our passage through the world, on reflection and reconciliation between the natural and the artificial. Curated by Johan Myburg. Carbon dad 2017 (2020) was selected for this exhibition.

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AMPERSAND FOUNDATION

21 YEARS CELEBRATION EXHIBITION

University of Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa

11 September – 9 October

2019

This extensive show, curated by Gordon Froud, senior lecturer at FADA (UJ) showcased the depth of South Africa's art scene and included works by numerous Ampersand Fellows like Diane Victor, Paul Emmanuel, Gabrielle Goliath, Mbongeni Buthelezi, Penny Siopis, Nicholas Hlobo, Senzeni Marasela, Stephen Hobbs, Alan Laing and Heidi Fouri. The Ampersand Foundation has had an immense impact on the country's fine art landscape over the last 21 years by affording visual arts practitioners exposure to the wider international arts landscape of New York. Rough collar (2018) was selected by the curator for this exhibition.

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REGARDS: PHOTGRAPHIE CAMEROUNAISE / DIGITAL AFRICA – CASABLANCA

Biennale Internationale de Casablanca Project Space, Morocco

18 April – 15 June

2019

Organised as part of the 5th Biennale Internationale de Casablanca 2020 incubation programme, with events planned in Casablanca throughout 2019 and 2020, this showcase brought together established and emerging practitioners working across photography, video and installation. Digital Africa – Casablanca featured video works by: Hakeem Adam (Ghana), Driss Aroussi (Morocco/France), Wendinagegn Belete (Ethiopia/Norway), Paul Emmanuel (Soudh Africa), Badr El Hammami (Morocco/France), Khireddine Khaldoun (Algeria), Mohammed Amine Al Makouti (Morocco), Mahlôt Sansosa (Brazil/Tanzania), Yvon Ngassam (Cameroon), Marton Robinson (Costa Rica), Leandré le Roux (South Africa) and Carly Whitaker (South Africa). Remember-dismember and 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) were selected by curator Christine Eyene, for this exhibition.

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SWAY: A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION

Now Gallery, The Open Window, Irene, South Africa

27 March – 30 June

2019

SWAY was Now Gallery's first photography exhibition, considering the theme of motion and the possibility of changing one's mind. Participating artists: Elsa Bleda, Mary Sibande, Michael Meyersfeld, Dani Bester, Ross Garrett, Alet Pretorius, Carla Crafford, Susanna Smith, Bernard Brand, Suzette du Plooy, Shannon Daniels, Jonina Botha, Dan Roberts, Warren James, Ryno Stols, Karl van Heerden, Paul Emmanuel, Graham De Lacy and Henry Engelbrecht.

JACK GINSBERG CENTRE FOR BOOK ARTS OPENING EXHIBITION

Wits Art Museum, Johannesburg, South Africa

26 March – 30 June

2019

Art collector and philanthropist Jack Ginsberg began collecting "artists' books" (artwork in the form of books) in the early 1970s, and since then has amassed a world-renowned collection of more than 3,000 pieces, plus thousands of additional items related to this contemporary art form. Ginsberg recently donated his collection of artist's books to the Wits Art Museum (WAM), which has been accommodated in the newly dedicated Jack Ginsberg Centre of the Book Arts, a new addition to the WAM archives that will be a backdrop for future exhibitions. For three months WAM hosts the inaugural exhibition at the Jack Ginsberg Centre for Book Arts, featuring a selection of the collection's standout pieces. Curated by Prof. David Paton, Jack Ginsberg and Rosalind Cleaver.

Including works by: Walter Batiss, Kim Berman, Joseph Beuys, Belinda Blignaut, Willem Boshoff, Sara Bodman, Louise Bourgeois, John Cage, Alexander Calder, Sonia Delaunay, Francesco Clemente, Steven Cohen, Christine Dixie, Jim Dine, Max Ernst, Olafur Eliasson, Paul Emmanuel, Gilbert & George, David Hockney, Jasper Johns, William Kentridge, Atta Kwami, Sol LeWitt, Robert Motherwell, Gerhard Marx, Judith Mason, Man Ray, Edward Ruscha, Lucas Samaras, Robbin Silverberg, Joachim Schönfeldt, Durant Sihlali, Richard Tuttle, Diane Victor, Kara Walker, Andy Warhol, Alastair Whitton, among others. Cathexis (2003) and an untitled work contributed to Robbin Ami Silverberg's book object Uhanga Dihangara were selected by the curators for this exhibition.

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WOUNDS AND RELICS

Gallery 2, Johannesburg, South Africa

1 – 22 September

2018

The exhibiting artists explore the paradox of simultaneously forgetting and remembering the social scars of violent conflicts and how we carry these with us, whether as traces or wounds, or as recovered objects from the past.

MATERIAL GAINS: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM THE SPIER COLLECTION

Stellenbosch University Museum, Stellenbosch, South Africa

25 July – 15 November

2018

Material Gains showcases more than 50 works from Spier's diverse collection of contemporary art. The pieces are by emerging and estabished artists working across the African continent – including South Africa, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Mozambique, Congo and Nigeria. Unravelling (2017) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

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TURBINE ART FAIR 2018

Art Source South Africa Booth GH4, Turbine Hall, Johannesburg, South Africa

12 – 15 July

2018

Turbine Art Fair is a platform for galleries, artists, curators and other art organisations to promote emerging and established talents in an accessible and enjoyable way. In doing this the fair aims to promote new work and talent and to create a new art audience and collector base. Rough Collar (2018), The Lost Men France IV (2014) and The Lost Men I (2003) were exhibited by Art Source South Africa.

ASPIRE ART AUCTIONS: HISTORIC, MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART

The Park on 7, Hyde Park Corner, Johannesburg, South Africa

17 June

2018

Committed to the growth and development of the African art market, Aspire Art Auctions is the first and, to date, the only auction house in South Africa to pay living South African artists royalties on the resale of their works of art on auction.

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STRAUSS & CO: CONTEMPORARY ART

Block B, Cape Town Cruise Terminal, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town, South Africa

14 – 17 February

2018

The first-ever stand-alone contemporary art auction to be held in South Africa. The sale, which focuses on outstanding examples of contemporary art made by South African, African and diaspora artists, will coincide with the Cape Town Art Fair (16–18 February 2018). A signed, dated and numbered (5/10) Blu Ray disc of 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was selected by the Strauss & Co. contemporary art specialists for this auction.

I AM BECAUSE YOU ARE: A SEARCH FOR UBUNTU WITH PERMISSION TO DREAM

Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

2 February – 31 March

2018

The Standard Bank Gallery joins hands with renowned artist and curator, Usha Seejarim to present an inspiring exhibition of art works lifted from the bank's corporate art collection. Featuring Table number 12 (2010). Including works by: H.C Andrews, Percy Ndithembile Konqobe, Alan Crump, Paul Emmanuel, Barbara Jeppe, Johannes Masego Segogela, Gerard Sekoto, Willie Bester, Robert Hodgins, Daniel Naudé, Norman Clive Catherine, William Joseph Kentridge, Walter Oltmann, Dumile Feni, Kim Lieberman, Lucky Madlo Sibiya, Andrew Tshabangu, Thami Mnyele, Samuel Daniell, Joni Brenner, Diane Victor, Lisa Brice, Kudzanai Chiurai, Hasan and Husain Essop, Haroon Gunn Salie, Gerhard Marx, Sydney Kumalo, Pierre Crocquet, Norman Kaplan, Colbert Mashile, Thomas Trevor Motswai, Sam Nhlengethwa, Penelope Siopis, Nhlanhla Xaba, Pieter Hugo, Anton Van Wouw.

THE ART OF READING: FROM WILLIAM KENTRIDGE TO WIKIPEDIA

Meermanno Museum, The Hague, The Netherlands

18 November 2017 – 5 March

2018

This exhibition organised by The House of the Book (a collaboration of Museum Meermanno and the National Library of the Netherlands). The exhibition will elucidate the reading process. The six rooms each have a theme that is linked to the physical process of reading: leafing through, touching, looking, remembering, focussing and reacting. Most of our senses are involved in the process, as are many areas in the brain. Questions about the process will help the visitor formulate some answers: How does the reading brain work? What types of reading should be distinguished? How to deal with multi media books – sound, image, typography? How to experience works on paper versus digitised works? The show unites works that are multi-sensorial or pluriform (video/paper, sound/image etc). There will be no books in cases, all works can be touched by the visitors. Selected artists: Scott Blake, Amaranth Borsuk & Brad Bouse, Jan Dirk van der Burg, Marinus van Dijke, Paul Emmanuel, Eyejack, Juan Fontanive, Carina Hesper, Mirabelle Jones, William Kentridge, Kraak & Smaak, Michael Mandiberg, Simon Morris, Didier Mutel, Rick Myers, Heidi Neilson, Joyce Overheul, Sebastian Schmieg & Silvio Lorusso, Rebecca Sutherland, Elisabeth Tonnard. The Lost Men Project, Grahamstown (2006) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

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RETHINKING KAKOTOPIA

University of Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa

6 September – 4 October

2017

The exhibition is based on the premise that transgressive visual interpretation of kakotopia should, but only sometimes does, play an important role in creating awareness of the crisis of exclusion and violence in the world today. Kakotopia, from the Greek 'kakos' (bad, vile, ugly, and unhappy) and 'topos' (place), was the term used by English philosopher Jeremy Bentham to describe a negative state of society, an anti-utopia characterised by chaos and disintegration. The literature describes a kakotopian society as one where the citizens often live in a dehumanised state, with fear of the outside world, having lost respect for the natural world.

Rethinking Kakotopia encompasses visual explorations and commentary around the ongoing issues that surround our notions of identity and belonging in the contemporary world; how these notions often negate our 'sense of place'. The exhibition explores stories of (amongst other things), corruption, emotive nationalism, xenophobia, belonging, nostalgia, sentiment, patriotism, freedom, and rage against the decimation of our fauna. The invited artists are asked to formulate reflections on the ability and psyche of people to survive and respond to the challenges of change; to move from kakotopia to utopia. Curator Derek Zietsman selected Remember-dismember (2015) for this exhibition.

RECENT ACQUISITIONS: UNISA – THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA PERMANENT ART COLLECTION

UNISA Art Gallery, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa

5 – 31 August

2017

A group exhibition of new acquisitions for the UNISA Permanent Art Collection, featuring the video Remember-dismember (2015). Including works by Wayne Barker, Florine Demosthene, Frikkie Eksteen, Paul Emmanuel, Megan Erasmus, Ann Mary Gollifer, Ayana V. Jackson, Gwen Miller, Mohau Modisakeng, Aida Muluneh, Cedric Nunn, Obie Oberholzer, Jody Paulsen, Johannes Phokela, Xolela Sogoni, Nicola Roos, Ransome Stanley and others. Curated by Bongani Mkhonza.

BOOKNESSES: ARTISTS' BOOKS FROM THE JACK GINSBERG COLLECTION

University of Johannesburg Art Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

25 March – 5 May

2017

Curated by Prof. David Paton, assisted by Annali Dempsey, Roselind Clever and Jack Ginsberg. An exhibition of 258 book objects, historical and contemporary, by South African and International artists, showcased in one of the most comprehensive exhibits of artists' books ever to have been held internationally. Incuding works by: Walter Batiss, Kim Berman, Joseph Beuys, Belinda Blignaut, Willem Boshoff, Sara Bodman, Louise Bourgeois, John Cage, Alexander Calder, Sonia Delaunay, Francesco Clemente, Steven Cohen, Christine Dixie, Jim Dine, Max Ernst, Olafur Eliasson, Paul Emmanuel, Gilbert & George, David Hockney, Jasper Johns, William Kentridge Atta Kwami, Sol LeWitt, Robert Motherwell, Gerhard Marx, Judith Mason, Man Ray, Edward Ruscha, Lucus Samaras, Robbin Silverberg, Joachim Schönfeldt, Durant Sihlali, Richard Tuttle, Diane Victor, Kara Walker, Andy Warhol, Alastair Whitton, among others. Emmanuel's artists' book Cathexis (2003) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

PANEL DISCUSSION: FLESH

College Art Association Annual Conference, Midtown Hilton, New York City, USA

15 – 18 February

2017

The College Art Association Annual Conference is the largest international gathering of professionals in the visual arts. The program is filled with opportunities to join more than 250 stimulating sessions and meetings in a wide range of topics on art scholarship and practice; to engage in in-depth discussions on new scholarship, innovative art and issues in the arts today; and to connect with colleagues from across the country and the world. At this conference, Professor Shannen Hill (Baltimore Museum of Art) presents her paper, Thinking Skin: An Epidural Understanding of Paul Emmanuel's Lost Men Project on the panel Flesh, convened by The Arts Council of the African Studies Association (ACASA).

IN PLAIN SIGHT: SOCIAL LIFE IN SOUTH AFRICA AND ROMANIA BEFORE AND AFTER 1989

ApARTe Gallery of George Enescu University of Arts & Borderline Art Space, Iasi, Romania

25 November – 8 December

2016

Artists: Omar Badsha (SA), Matei Bejenaru (RO), Tanisha Bhana (SA), Reshma Chhiba (SA), Claudiu Cobilanschi (RO), Paul Emmanuel (SA), Lebohang Kganye (SA), Iosif Kiraly (RO), Andrei Nacu (RO), Cedric Nunn (SA), Dumitru Oboroc (RO). Curators: Cristian Nae (RO) and Judy Peter (SA).

The nineties were a turning point for countries in the former Eastern European bloc and for South African society. While Romanian society underwent violent changes of the political regime in the transition from socialism to a primarily savage form of capitalism, South Africa embarked on the road leading to the end of apartheid in 1994. The new dispensation was marked by the jubilation of the Rainbow Nation and the African Renaissance as vehicles to grapple with the social constructions of identities in a ‘new’ South Africa. Exploring the capacity of the photographic medium to capture and reproduce ordinary views of daily life and to transform habitual ways of looking at these images, thus releasing their implicit political potentialities, the current exhibition presents for the first time in Romania, a selection of contemporary photography from South Africa, set in dialogue with Romanian artists who employ the medium of photography to investigate recent, small scale social processes and transformations. While South African artists are critically adressing issues related to race, ethnicity, class and gender, constructing micro-cartographies of civil and economic disposession, Romanian artists are more poetically involved in the exploration of lines of fracture in collective memory, social marginality and precarious economies. The curators selected The Lost Men France IV  (2004) for this exhibition.

FOUNDATIONS AND FUTURES: CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF THE BAG FACTORY

Fordsburg Artists’ Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa

28 October – 10 December

2016

For 25 years the Bag Factory Artists' Studios has been more than just a building and studio space. It has provided the foundation of many an artist's career. Built out of the dream for artists from different backgrounds to be able to work together, the Bag Factory is a community that continuously supports and builds on its ethos of "the community studio space where artists practice is held in the highest regard and experimentation is encouraged." Over 25 years these foundations have been strengthened by the artists and staff who have poured their passion and efforts into the community and ethos of the space. In recent years the Bag Factory has worked hard to encourage a younger community of artists to engage in our programming ensuring that the life-blood of the space - interaction and development - continues to pump.

The community has played host to artists such as Helen Sebidi, Deborah Bell, Sam Nhlengethwa, Penny Siopsis, Benon Lutaaya, Blessing Ngobeni, Neo Matloga, Dinkies Sithole, Kay Hassan and many, many more. We have created an international following through our visiting artists programme and a consistent space for art loving members of the public to experience outstanding work. On Friday 28th October 2016, the Bag Factory begins the celebration of an incredible 25 years with an exhibition entitled Foundations and Futures. Since the inception of the organisation, over 300 artists have been through the space either as studio artists, visiting artists, participants in workshops and exhibitions and as winners of award programmes. All of them have been influenced and have influenced the space in many rich and diverse ways.

Artists participating in the exhibition Foundations and Futures opening on Friday 28 October 2016 include Blake Daniels; Paul Emmanuel; Jarrett Erasmus; Marie Fricout; Gordon Froud; Carlo Galli; Arash Hanaei; Diana Hyslop; Sharlene Khan; Asanda Kupa; David Koloane; Shenaz Mahomed; Pat Mautloa; Tshepo Mosopa; Ndikhumbule Ngqinambi; Tracey Rose; Usha Seejarim; Lerato Shadi; Johan Thom; Stijn van Dorpe and Mary Wafer. Emmanuel's photogravure etching Scar (2015) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

INTERNATIONAL PRINTMAKING ALLIANCE EXHIBITION

Taimiao Art Gallery, Imperial Ancestral Temple, Beijing, China

25 September – 10 October

2017

This international exhibition showcases printmaking works with perspective and constructive features recommended by Alliance members as well as the latest creations based on national culture, history, literature or other materials. Participating artists from South Africa: Dominic Thorburn, Bevan de Wet, Sara-Aimee Verity, Christine Dixie, Vuli Nyoni, Mongezi Ncaphayi, Paul Emmanuel, Vusi Kumalo, Sam Nhlengethwa, Nhlanhla Xaba, Diane Victor, Kagiso Patrick Mautloa, Thama Kase, Michael Taylor, Ina van Zyl, Katherine Bull, Zola Toyi.

The South African contingent was curated by Professor Dominic Thorburn of Rhodes University, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Emmanuel's stone lithograph Platform number 5 (2011) was selected for this exhibition.

RITES OF PASSAGE: BETWEEN LIGHT AND SHADOW

Irma Stern Museum, Cape Town, South Africa

11 – 18 June

2016

Rites of passage are experiences that mark the transition from one phase of life to another; we are wanderers constantly travelling between passageways of light and darkness. These unfolding linear progressions bound to time, or fluid journeys from a past to future-nows, can be understood through Arnold van Gennep’s tripartite pattern of human transitions; ‘detachment’ (movement away from a previous state of being), ‘liminality’ (journeying through a state of ambiguity) and ‘re-aggregation’ (realigning oneself with the shifts and reintegrating into society). These fleeting moments become the markers of living, birth rites, religious or cultural initiation rites, mortuary rites and everything in between, first words, birthdays, educational milestones, and adolescence to adulthood. In contemporary society some of these ceremonial devices, once shared through communal ritualistic practices, have been abandoned, and others transformed to reflect contemporary conditions. Artists extend these rituals into modern life, articulating rites of passage through their practice. They bring our awareness back to these moments of release, transgression and transformation, by documenting, reenacting or translating rites of passage in various mediums. Like the chapters of our stories, these junctures in life are momentous ceremonies that are performed and remembered, or the intimate shifts that silently go unnoticed. We become the product of these experiences. These attuning practices that we design and ascribe meaning to, rights that are scripted and imposed upon us or granted to us, shape our sense of identity.

Emmanuel's stone lithographs Number 05000674PV  (2009) and Parade of Shadows (2009) were selected by the curators for this exhibition. This exhibition was organised by Sulger-Buel Lovell Gallery.

PANEL DISCUSSION: VISUAL MEMORY IN A TIME OF ENDLESS WAR

808 Gallery, Boston University, USA

11 February

2016

Presented in conjunction with Paul Emmanuel: Remnants, this panel will explore collective experiences of loss and mourning and processes of memory and memorialisation in times of global conflict and war. 4 – 6 pm, 11 February 2016.

Panelists included:
Pamela Allara: Associate Professor Emerita of Brandeis University.
Shannen Hill: Associate Curator for African Art, Head of Department Arts of Africa, the Americas, Asia and Pacific Islands, Baltimore Museum of Art.
Paul Landau: Professor of History, University of Maryland.
Timothy Longman: Director, Boston University African Studies Center.
Susan Werbe: Independent Scholar.

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ARTIST TALK

Boston University, USA

3 February

2016

A presentation of Emmanuel's project The Lost Men France in conjunction with his exhibition Paul Emmanuel: remnants. 12:30 pm, 3 February 2016.

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FNB JOBURG ART FAIR 2015

Artist Proof Studio Booth, Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa

11 – 13 September

2015

The FNB JoburgArtFair returned to the Sandton Convention Centre, presenting 50 modern and contemporary exhibitors from 8 countries. Two photogravure etchings, scar (2015) and lesion (2015) were exhibited by Artist Proof Studio.

BETWEEN DEMOCRACIES 1989 – 2014: MEMORY AND COMMEMORATION

Constitution Hill, Johannesburg, South Africa

1 – 30 September

2015

The theme of this exhibition responds to the emergence from totalitarian rule that has been a historical reality for both East Central and East Southern Europe and South Africa since 1989/1994. It is a collaborative international project and artists considered both the historicisation of transitional trauma and the effects of regime change (both positive and negative) on the collective memories lingering in their respective national psyches. Their responses problematised both past memories and the current direction of social politics. The exhibition will be first hosted in Constitutional Hill, Johannesburg, South Africa, from 1-30 September 2015. This venue was selected because it is an exhibition space that is historically relevant to the fraught history of the struggle for democracy in South Africa. The exhibition will then be presented at the Dom umenia/Kunsthalle Bratislava in March – June 2016. Subsequent venues and dates in Europe to be announced.

Curators: Judy Peter (University of Johannesburg, South Africa), Karen von Veh (University of Johannesburg, South Africa), Richard Gregor (Chief Curator of Dom umenia/Kunsthalle Bratislava, Slovakia), Cristian Nae (George Enescu University of Arts, Iasi, Romania), Ljiljana Kolesnik (Institute of Art History, Croatia).

PANEL DISCUSSION: ECAS 2015: 6TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE OF AFRICAN STUDIES

Paris-Sorbonne University, France

8 – 10 July

2015

Collective Mobilisations in Africa: Contestation, Resistance, Revolt. The historic turn embodied by the Arab “revolutions”, whose repercussions are felt throughout the Sahel; anger, expressed in a range of ways, at the rising cost of living; mobilisations around issues of citizenship; manifold forms of religious revival: all seem to attest to a profound political reconfiguration underway across Africa. These and associated forms of contestation have pushed new actors to the front of the stage, at the crossroads of local and global dynamics. To fully appreciate the complexity of these developments, we must consider longer-term histories of uprising, stand-taking and engagement on the continent, casting a renewed gaze on jihads, slave uprisings, mass conversions and dynastic conflicts. Too, we must reflect in novel ways on the social trajectories of actors involved in present-day contestations and on the responses that the latter elicit from those in power. This in turn should bring us to pay close attention to repertories of collective action, to modes of transgression and subversion, to takes on activism, and to ways in which all of these intersect with social, generational and gender statuses.

Shannen Hill's paper, 'Wearing War, Silencing Soldiers: Art, the Body and Recovered Histories in South Africa' on the panel 'State Censorship and State Sponsorship in Contemporary African Arts' convened by Lisa Brittan and Gary Van Wyk, was presented at this conference.

TURBINE ART FAIR 2015

Art Source South Africa Booth, Turbine Hall, Johannesburg, South Africa

16 – 19 July

2015

Turbine Art Fair is a platform for galleries, artists, curators and other art organisations to promote emerging and established talents in an accessible and enjoyable way. In doing this the fair aims to promote new work and talent and to create a new art audience and collector base. Two photogravure etchings, scar (2015) and lesion (2015) were exhibited by Art Source South Africa.

TWENTY: ART IN THE TIME OF DEMOCRACY

FADA Gallery, University of Johannesburg, South Africa

11 July – 7 August

2015

This exhibition is in celebration of 20 years of South Africa's democracy and is intended to be a showcase of historical and contemporary work that looks at six different aspects of South African life and experience. Appropriate artists and particular works have been selected to narrate these experiences. A broad range of artists and demographics have been selected to showcase the depth of talent and commentary that comes out of contemporary South African art. Curated by Senior Lecturer Gordon Froud and Professor Karen Von Veh from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) and number 05000674PV (2009) were selected by the curators for this exhibition.

BATTLEGROUND

Standard Bank Gallery, Albany History Museum, National Arts Festival, Grahamstown, South Africa

2 – 12 July

2015

Curator Michael Godby’s exhibition is a response to the challenge of showing Charles Bell’s 60 drawings of the War of the Axe in Grahamstown, the very territory that was fought over during the Wars of Dispossession, and to viewers, most of whom would have been constructed as the ‘enemy’ in Bell’s account of the war. The challenge is met in two ways. First, the drawings themselves are contextualised in a series of installations. Bell had been in Grahamstown before the war broke out adjudicating land claims relating to the 1820 settlers: display of contemporary surveying equipment and relevant maps will underline the point that first and foremost, this war was about the colonial acquisition of land. Similarly, Bell’s image of the Xhosa represents a significant change from earlier idealised views and is derived in large measure from contemporary racial theories that can be illustrated from books of the time. Such prejudices are also apparent in many of the newspaper reports of the war which will be reproduced as text panels in the exhibition. And installations of muskets and swords from the period will make the suggestion that Bell’s drawings were every bit as much an offensive weapon as the actual instruments of war.

The second part of the exhibition comprises recent representations of the War of the Axe and related Wars of Dispossession. These include new versions of historical events, by both black and white artists, that give a very different account of the wars. Other works isolate the pictorial language of colonial artists, notably steel engraving and perspective, to show how these elements are implicated in the colonial project. Other works again challenge the construction of masculinity inherent in Bell’s, and others’ accounts of the wars. And several works lament the tragic waste of life that occurred in these wars. A voile panel from Paul Emmanuel's Lost Men Grahamstown (2004) was selected for this exhibition.

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REPRESENTATIONS OF OTHERNESS AND RESISTANCE

Johannes Stegmann Art Gallery, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

20 May – 19 June

2015

The Johannes Stegmann Art Gallery presents the exhibition "Representations of Otherness and Resistance" in collaboration with the Centre for Africa Studies at the University of the Free State (UFS) from the 20th of May to 19th of June 2015. The exhibition is part of a five year multi-disciplinary project that seeks to capture the mult-layered nuances of spatial, temporal and sonic dynamics within the context of Africa (and more specifically South Africa) as these relate to the core pillars of various artistic and alternative creative forms of representation of otherness and resistance. The exhibition runs together with a colloquium, seminars and the Africa Day Memorial Lecture by Prof Alcinda Honwana planned for the week of the 20th of May. A critical dialogue session on the exhibition also takes place on the 21st of May, facilitated by Prof Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela.

The exhibition is co-curated by Annali Dempsey from the UJ Art Gallery and Angela de Jesus (UFS). It includes a selection of works from institutional collections namely, the Oliewenhuis Art Museum, William Humphrey's Art Gallery, University of Johannesburg and University of the Free State collections. The exhibition is presented with an exhibition catalogue which includes academic articles by Prof Heidi Hudson (UFS), Prof Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela (UFS), Landi Raubenheimer (UJ) and Wilhelm van Rensburg (UJ). 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

TWENTY: ART IN THE TIME OF DEMOCRACY

Pretoria Art Museum, South Africa

9 – 21 May

2015

This exhibition is in celebration of 20 years of South Africa's democracy and is intended to be a showcase of historical and contemporary work that looks at six different aspects of South African life and experience. Appropriate artists and particular works have been selected to narrate these experiences. A broad range of artists and demographics have been selected to showcase the depth of talent and commentary that comes out of contemporary South African art. Curated by Senior Lecturer Gordon Froud and Professor Karen Von Veh from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) and number 05000674PV (2009) were selected by the curators for this exhibition.

PERMANENT WAR: THE AGE OF GLOBAL CONFLICT

Barbara and Steven Grossman Gallery & Mrs. E Ross Anderson Auditorium, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA

29 January – 7 March

2015

In the century since World War I, coined "The war to end all wars," battles have raged on around the globe. The nature of warfare has changed dramatically with wars no longer beginning with formal declarations or ending with peace treaties; instead, violence spreads underground, with terror surfacing in ever-changing locations; drone warfare merges politics with computer games; news from far-flung battlefronts is devastatingly immediate. January 29–March 7, 2015, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (SMFA) will tackle this difficult subject with its spring exhibition, "Permanent War: The Age of Global Conflict," guest curated by Pamela Allara. "The many commemorations in Europe of the centenary of World War I inspired me to propose a war-themed exhibition to Joanna Soltan, SMFA Curator," says Allara. "Although the nature of war is rapidly changing, its death and destruction remain. The artists included in the exhibition examine our state of permanent war with insight, courage and not infrequently, ironic humor."

Organized into five themes—Mechanized Bodies, Combat as Performance, Living in a War Zone, Conflict as Media Entertainment, and Landscape as Cemetery—Allara brings together 16 artists to explore the lives of military and private citizens are surveyed, manipulated, controlled, and threatened in this era of perpetual warfare.

ARTISTS
Matthew Arnold, Claire Beckett, Bill Burke, Bonnie Donohue, Paul Emmanuel, Harun Farocki, Coco Fusco, Adam Harvey, Ken Hruby, Lamia Joreige, Richard Mosse, Trevor Paglen, Jamal Penjweny, Sig Bang Schmidt and Steve Dalachinsky, Paul Stopforth, and Mark Tribe.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) has been selected by the curator for this exhibition.

More information

TWENTY: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM SOUTH AFRICA

Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, Appalachian State University, North Carolina, USA

11 July 2014 – 7 February

2015

This exhibition is in celebration of 20 years of South Africa's democracy and is intended to be a showcase of historical and contemporary work that looks at six different aspects of South African life and experience. Appropriate artists and particular works have been selected to narrate these experiences. A broad range of artists and demographics have been selected to showcase the depth of talent and commentary that comes out of contemporary South African art. 

Curated by Senior Lecturer Gordon Froud and Professor Karen Von Veh from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. 

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) and number 05000674PV (2009) were selected by the curators for this exhibition.

RETURN TO THIEPVAL: IMPRINTING AND ERASING MEMORIES OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR

Alliance Française, Johannesburg & Cape Town, South Africa

11 & 21 November

2014

A presentation of Paul Emmanuel's project The Lost Men France (2014), accompanied by Bill Nasson's historical contribution was held on Tuesday 11 November 2014 at 18h00 for 18h30 at The Alliance Française, Johannesburg and on the 21 November at the Alliance Française, Cape Town. 

Bill Nasson is a Professor in the History Department at Stellenbosch University. He specialises in the history of war and society and his works have been translated into Dutch, German, French and Italian. His new book, World War I and the People of South Africa is due for release in November this year.

DOING HAIR: ART AND HAIR IN AFRICA

Wits Art Museum, Johannesburg, South Africa

20 August – 2 November

2014

This exhibition celebrates the creativity, individuality and innovation in hairstyling and art, in South Africa, and in other parts of the African continent. The exhibition is sponsored by Black Like Me, South Africa’s iconic hair care company. This partnership between WAM and Black Like Me, the company who revolutionised the South African hair care industry in the 1980s, makes possible an exciting and highly topical exhibition.

The political, social, cultural and economic implications of hair and hairdressing are explored in the exhibition. It also looks at how hair communicates information about age, religious affiliation, social status, political ideologies and aspirations. Extraordinary objects that are used to protect, style and adorn hair, historical and contemporary artworks, barbershop posters, films and installations from Wits Art Museum and other public and private collections are included.

Emmanuel's short film 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

TURBINE ART FAIR 2014

Art Source South Africa Booth A16, Turbine Hall, Johannesburg, South Africa

17 – 20 July

2014

Turbine Art Fair is a platform for galleries, artists, curators and other art organisations to promote emerging and established talents in an accessible and enjoyable way. In doing this the fair aims to promote new work and talent and to create a new art audience and collector base.

WALDSEE 1944

2B Gallery, Budapest, Hungary

6 June – 2 July

2014

The exhibition of works by Hungarian and international artists at the 2B Gallery is a tribute to the 565,000 Hungarian Jews who perished in World War II. The unanswered letters from 1944, Auschwitz turn into postcards with the help of the artists. The project started in 2004 and has been steadily growing with many new works since then. We will exhibit the works of 110 artists upon the 70th anniversary of the Holocaust.

The Lost Men Grahamstown I (2004) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

MY JOBURG

Staatliche Kunstammlungen, Dresden, Germany

26 October 2013 – 5 January

2014

The Johannesburg art scene – an exhibition by the Galerie Neue Meister (New Master Gallery) of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden at the Kunsthalle in the Lipsiusbau. From October 26, 2013 to January 5, 2014, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden will be showing the temporary exhibition My Joburg. The Johannesburg art scene. It was previously held with great success at La Maison Rouge – Fondation Antoine de Galbert in Paris. The exhibition presents works by some 50 artists. Photographs, installations, sculptures, sketches and videos tell visitors about the buzzing art scene in Johannesburg, a city that is home to eight million and shaped by social upheaval. My Joburg was organised by La Maison Rouge – Fondation Antoine de Galbert, Paris, with the support of the National Art Council (NAC) of the Republic of South Africa and the Institut Français, under the curatorial direction of Paula Aisemberg and Antoine de Galbert. number 05000674PV (2009) was selected by the museum's curators for this exhibition.

Contemporary & announcement

La Maison Rouge press release [PDF]

CONFÉRENCE DE PAUL EMMANUEL

EESI/École européenne supérieure de l'image, Angouléme, France

8 October

2013

Après la projection de son court-métrage 3SAI : A Rite of Passage (2008), Paul Emmanuel, artiste sud africain, retracera la création de ses projets Transitions (2008) et The Lost Men (2004 – ).

Il parlera également de sa nouvelle création “Touch me” (2013), présentée en avant-première au Cube, Centre de Creation Numerique, Issy-Les-Moulineaux. Il s’agit d’une œuvre tactile visuelle et sonore qui explore les idées liées à la mémoire et aux souvenirs.

Touch me fait partie d’un projet global appelé The Lost Men France (2014) coïncidant avec les commémorations des 100 ans du début de la première guerre mondiale durant laquelle de nombreux soldats sud-africains sont tombés. Paul Emmanuel y présente son corps en plan serré, tantôt vêtu de tenues de cérémonie militaires historiques ou contemporaines, tantôt habillé comme un employé d’entreprise. Une bande-son de la voix de l’artiste invite le spectateur à toucher l’écran tactile, provoquant l’habillage et le déshabillage des différentes zones de son corps et révélant sa peau, temporairement marqué des noms de soldats Sud-africains de la Première Guerre mondiale, mais aussi des victimes de la grève de Marikana Miner (2012) et de l’incursion armée de la République Centrafricaine en 2013. Ces impressions fugitives disparaissent ou réapparaissent tant que le spectateur continue à le toucher, évoquant une "guérison" ou une "nouvelle blessure" répétée de la peau.

“TOUCH ME” (South Africa – France Seasons 2012-2013)

Le Cube, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris, France

1 – 30 October

2013

Exploring the concepts of memory & memorial, "Touch me" (2013) is a high-tech, touch-sensitive, video & sound artwork created by Paul Emmanuel. It is a non-partisan complement to his Lost Men France planned for the 2014-18 Centenary of World War One. “Touch me” portrays a progression of closely-cropped, video vignettes of Emmanuel's body either fully exposed or clothed in historic & contemporary military regalia or in formal corporate attire. A soundtrack of the artist's voice invites the viewer to touch the 'sensitive screen' or 'skin', provoking the enrobing & disrobing of different areas of his body, revealing & concealing his skin temporarily branded with the names of casualties of armed-conflict. These fleeting impressions fade or re-appear as the viewer continues touching – evoking a repeated ‘healing’ or 're-wounding' of the skin. "Touch me" depicts the names of both black & white South African First World War servicemen, pressed into the artist’s body alongside those of the Allies & Germans. Further unveilings also reveal South Africa's involvement in The Second World War,  Korean War,  Angolan Bush War, the 2012 Marikana Miner's Massacre & the 2013 Central African Republic Conflict.

The exhibition of "Touch me" (2013) at Le Cube is organised as part of the South Africa-France Seasons 2012 & 2013.

MY JOBURG

La Maison Rouge: Fondation Antoine de Galbert, Paris, France

20 June – 23 September

2013

La Maison Rouge continues the series of exhibitions focusing on the arts scene in major provincial cities. After MY WINNIPEG (Manitoba, Canada), an exhibition presented during the summer 2011, the second of the cities will be Johannesburg (South Africa). number 05000674PV (2009) was selected by the museum's curators for this exhibition. An event on the occasion of the Seasons South Africa 2012/2013 in France in partnership with Institut Français.

Contemporary & announcement

La Maison Rouge press release [PDF]

WEERBERIG – WEATHER REPORT

Aardklop National Arts Festival, Potchefstroom, South Africa

24 – 29 September

2013

"Our landscape is not an eternal constant, it is mutable, constantly changing and being re-negotiated. In South Africa we have our very specific history to contend with. Land, ownership and national identity is integral to any understanding of the South African landscape. How did we and how do we posit emotion and meaning onto the landscape? Ours is a fraught history and land issues still play an important, often divisive role in our current social and political space. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Land-Act. This piece of legislation provided necessary armour for the division of land and people in South Africa. We are still dealing with this and it has left a permanent scar on the South African psyche." – Luan Nel (Curator)

A one-off, original drawing scratched into exposed photographic paper titled: A Farm Road, Somme (2013) was created for this group exhibition.

LES ÉCRANS DE LA LIBERTÉ: DIGITAL ANTHROPOLOGY FESTIVAL 2013

Le Cube, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris, France

20 – 21 March

2013

Le Cube and Les Écrans de la Liberté propose two days of discoveries and meetings centred on anthropology and new media with film projections and round-table discussions with authors and anthropologists. Today, digital technology is opening up numerous possibilities for driving all possible forms of association between images, sounds and texts. In this way, they are forging a new instrumental reason that today raises the need for new creations at the crossroads between digital art, anthropology and social science in conjunction with other disciplines such as neuroscience.

More and more frequently, realities addressed by anthropologists are often crossed by geopolitical tensions, economic and social crises, emergencies, migratory flows and discriminations which confront a large number of communities and people. This idea of 'interculturality', which is progressively becoming a more core part of investigations and studies, promotes and necessitates new areas of research and expression. But also, and maybe even above all, 'interculturality' tends to create its own field where one's views undergo profound changes thanks to others’ views, moving us towards other methods for universalism.

The aim of these two days is to promote the taking into account of these unique writings which integrate interactions, multiple points of view and collective creations, and even a sensory approach to all types of personal accounts. By giving form to their sensory apprehensions, they develop these elements which are essential to contextualising the subjects in question.

Paul Emmanuel’s 14-minute film 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was selected by Les Écrans de la Liberté to be screened at Le Cube for this festival.

AT HOME WITH THE LUDSKIS: MIDNIGHT MASS (Edition #7)

10th London Short Film Festival, Rio Cinema, London, UK

12 January

2013

At Home with the Ludskis: Midnight Mass (Edition # 7) – a multidisciplinary event held at the famous Rio Cinema as part of the 10th London Short Film Festival, brings together intriguing and inspiring moving image makers, artists, music makers and performers for a unique late night art club, curated by Granny Ludski.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was chosen after a call for artists sent out by guest curator Christine Eyene, invited to take part in this Midnight Mass by its host Granny Ludski.

THE ART OF BANKING: CELEBRATING THROUGH COLLECTIONS

Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

16 October – 1 December

2012

The exhibition marks Standard Bank's 150th year in banking. Works on the exhibition are drawn from the Standard Bank Corporate Art Collection, taking viewers on a decade by decade journey through South Africa's history over the 150 years of the bank's existence. It includes works by renowned South African artists such as John Mohl, Gerard Sekoto, Jacob Hendrik Pierneef, Brett Murray, Johannes Phokela, William Kentridge, Durant Sihlali, Sam Nhlengethwa, Trevor Makhoba, David Goldblatt, Alexis Preller, Penny Siopis and Wim Botha.

A display drawn from the rich archival and artefact collection of the Standard Bank Heritage Centre focuses on the 150-year history of Standard Bank. It comprises three components: The first covering the period up to 1987 traces the institution's history and growth into a major financial services organisation; the second describes the bank's expansion into Africa and other parts of the world, and tells the story of the journey to self-service banking through technological innovations; a third component includes an old banking hall, showcasing furniture and equipment used in previous eras.

Air on the Skin (2002) was selected by the curators from the Standard Bank Collection for this exhibition.

21BF: THE BAG FACTORY'S 21ST ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION

Turbine Hall & Fordsburg Artists’ Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa

3 August – 10 September

2012

The purpose of this exhibition is to celebrate the Bag Factory and its affiliated artists' achievements over the past 21 years. Curated by Melissa Goba.

NOT MY WAR

Michaelis Galleries, University of Cape Town, South Africa

29 June – 25 July

2012

Not My War is an exhibition of works by significant South African artists that have reflected on their  country’s involvement in border wars in Northern Namibia and Southern Angola during the 1960s to 1980s. Marking the 25th anniversary of the war’s bloodiest and most decisive battles, most notably at Cuito Cuanavale, Not My War looks at how these artists have been impacted by and responded to what is now commonly referred to as the Border War. Furthering the resurgence of dialogue around this ‘silent war’, the exhibition will endeavor to engage the complex personal and institutional discourse surrounding this conflict, as well as highlight the war’s continuing relevance and effect on South African society.

Curated by David Brits, participating artists are Wayne Barker, Christo Doherty, Paul Emmanuel, John Liebenberg, Jo Ractliffe, Colin Richards, Chad Rossouw, Penny Siopis, Christopher Swift and Gavin Younge. Exhibition and catalogue text by Natasha Norman. 

Emmanuel's short film 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) and his manière noire stone lithograph titled number 05000674PV (2009) were selected by the curator for this exhibition.

More information

DAK'ART 2012: BIENNALE OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART

Museum Theodore Monod, Dakar, Senegal

11 May – 10 June

2012

CURATORS: Christine EYENE, Nadira LAGGOUNE, Riason NAIDOO

THEME: " CONTEMPORARY CREATION AND SOCIAL DYNAMICS " 
The tenth edition of the biennale is held in a particular context. Indeed, 2012 is an electoral year in Senegal as was 2000. This year also marks the twentieth birthday of the most former biennale of the African continent. DAK'ART is maintained as a key event in the international art calendar. The theme chosen for this edition is expected to examine through various angles the dialogue that contemporary artists maintain with a social environment which is in constant mutation. Contemporary creation and social dynamics, is a field of investigation which academics, art critics and artists are invited to explore in the context of the meetings and exchanges of the edition 2012 of the Biennale.

Emmanuel's manière noire stone lithograph titled number 05000674PV (2009) was selected by the curators for this exhibition.

DAK’ART 2012 press release [PDF]

Art Source South Africa press release [PDF]

9th IN THE PALACE INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL

Old Cinema Hall, Balchik, Bulgaria

18 – 25 June

2011

IN THE PALACE is an international festival for professional short films of up to 45 minutes in length. It is held each year in the second half of June in the Black Sea town of Balchik. Established in 2003, the festival had grown from a competitive forum for student films into the largest and most prestigious short film festival in Bulgaria and the region. Nearly 250 short films from 44 countries, selected out of over 4000 titles, competed in the last edition of the festival. Our goal is to present and contribute to the development of contemporary film art in Bulgaria, Europe and the world, creating a favourable environment and platform for young filmmakers and established professionals.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was officially selected for this festival and was nominated for the Best Experimental Film award. The festival was attended by Emmanuel and Taryn Cohn of Art Source South Africa.

In The Palace Festival Awards and Nominations [PDF]

BLACK BOX

Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, USA

9 November 2011 – 2 January

2012

On view November 9, 2010 through January 2, 2011 as part of our year-long Black Box series of single-channel video screenings.

Paul Emmanuel’s short film 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) meditates on masculine identity in post-Apartheid South Africa. The work focuses on a mixed-race group of military recruits whose heads are being shaved – part of a process that turns individual young men into a collective of soldiers. Emmanuel emphasises this process of transformation through editing that moves with increasing speed from one close-up to another, each man blurring into the next. He intersperses footage of the head-shaving ritual with luscious tracking shots of an expansive, golden landscape in which rows of white shirts flutter like flags or peace offerings.

Emmanuel’s work was recommended to the Smart Museum by Jane Taylor, a South African curator and scholar, and Visiting Professor in the Department of English Languages and Literature.

7th SEDICICORTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Forlí, Italy

4 – 10 October

2010

This short film festival is held every year at the beginning of October in Italy, in the beautiful town of Forlì. It aims at offering visibility to the short film genre, offering its audience a careful selection of a number of short films submitted from all over the world. The festival is divided into four competitive sections:

MOVIE: International Fiction Films
ANIMA & LAB: International Animation & Experimental Films
DOC: International Documentary Films
CORTITALIA: National (Italy) Films of any genre 

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was officially selected to be screened at this festival 2010 in the LAB category.

5th SARDINIA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Sassari, Sardinia, Italy

22 – 26 June

2010

The final day of the Sardinia Film Festival 2010, opened with the last projections of short films in competition. From 17.30 to 20.00, were screened the works in Fiction, Animation, Documentary and V-Art/Experimental categories. The ceremony began at 21.15 in the courtyard of the Quadrangle. Prizes were awarded by a jury of experts composed by Lorenzo Saglio, president of New Circle Cinema, Piero Livi, dean of Sardinian directors, Maisetti Massimo, president of the National Federation of Film Clubs, Adriana Casu, cultural worker, Marino Canzoneri, Head Humane Society Iglesias, and Nando Scanu. Awarded the best works in Animation, Italy Fiction, Fiction International, Documentary, V-Art/Experimental, Showcase Sardinia, Fedic Gold and Fedic School categories.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was officially selected for this festival and won the Best Experimental Film award.

Sardinia Film Festival Programme 2010 [PDF]

Sardinia Film Festival: Comunicato del 26 giugno 2010/Press release of June, 26th [PDF]

Media Update announcement

19th SÉQUENCE COURT-MÉTRAGE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Toulouse, France

19 August – 28 November

2010

For more than seventeen years the Séquence Court-Metrage International Short-Film Festival supports and emphasises the unique qualities offered by short film through a series of competitions and themed programs. The Festival continues to develop Short-Version Cinema, building on new exchanges and partnerships. It showcases artistic visions inspired by international dialogue, originality and open-mindedness. Creativity is at the heart of Séquence’s philosophy and the Festival exhibits all genres of short film, from fiction, animation and documentary to experimental; both professional and amateur; and on either silver or digital supports.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) has been officially selected to be screened at this festival 2010.

VIDEOGUD: 10th VIDEO KONST FESTIVAL

Uppsala Konsert & Kongress, Sweden

27 – 28 May

2010

The VideoGUD programme screens selected videos in two periods in sixteen venues spread out in three counties in the middle of Sweden – in public libraries, museums, cultural centers, hospitals and schools. These programmes reach out to art and media students alike as well as new audiences. The focus of these programmes is to educate and inform. In addition, every spring in May, a two-day Video Art Festival takes place with national competitions where artists and critics give lectures to compliment the many screeenings.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was selected to be screened on this programme and at this festival in 2010.

39th INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ROTTERDAM

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

27 January – 7 February

2010

The International Film Festival Rotterdam (courtesy Wikipedia) is an annual film festival held in various cinemas in Rotterdam, Netherlands at the end of January. It is one of the larger film festivals in Europe, arguably in the Big Five, alongside Cannes, Venice, Berlin, and Locarno. The festival uses a tiger as its mascot.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) has been officially selected to be screened at this festival 2010.

4th AFRICA-IN-MOTION INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Edinburgh International Film Festival, Filmhouse, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

22 October – 1 November

2009

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was shortlisted a selection committee of film specialists for the Africa in Motion Short Film Competition. The Festival received over 60 entries from 22 African countries. All the shortlisted films were screened as part of the 4th Africa in Motion Film Festival 2009 on Monday 26 October, at the Edinburgh Filmhouse Cinema. The winner was selected by a jury, consisting of acclaimed Algerian filmmaker Amor Hakkar; filmmaker, presenter and writer Zina Saro-Wiwa; director of the Scottish Documentary Institute, Noe Mendelle; and high profile film critic, writer and producer Mark Cousins.

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was officially selected for this festival and competition, and won first place and the jury prize.

African Film Database

Africa-in-Motion Film Festival press release [PDF}

Art Source South Africa press release [PDF]

12TH ANTIMATTER FILM FESTIVAL

Open Space Arts Centre, Victoria, Canada

9 – 17 October

2009

Dedicated to the exhibition and nurturing of film and video as art, Antimatter has grown into the premier showcase of experimental cinema in the west. Encompassing screenings, installations, performances and media hybrids, Antimatter provides a noncompetitive festival setting in Victoria, British Columbia, free from commercial and industry agendas. The highest standards of curatorial practice are employed to build thematic programs of innovative film and video selected from international submissions. In addition, the annual Foreign Matter series has become the incubator for hundreds of short films, all new to North American audiences, compiled and contextualized by international curators.

The short film 3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was officially selected for screening at this film festival on Friday 16 October at 7pm.

ADDING SUBTRACTIONS

Fordsburg Artists’ Studios, Johannesburg, South Africa

18 June – 10 July

2009

Visiting curator Daniella Géo invited twenty five South African and international artists to participate in this exhibition. 

South African visual art shows a noteworthy prevalence of found footage, assemblage, collage, series, sequencing, weaving and sampling. If, on the one hand, these artistic strategies may reflect scarce economic resources, on the other, they symbolise the gathering of history's fragments – whether private or collective. Older and younger generations alike rearrange analog or distinct elements in order to reinforce or subvert a certain reality, thereby creating new socio-political and time-space relations.

Art is construction, but by adopting the above practices, artists highlight the gestures of de- and re-constructing. These acts evoke not only criticism, questioning and the search for meaning, but also stimulate memories of what has been left behind. Most works relate, even if indirectly, to their historical and cultural framework. Subjects and approaches vary – from personal to universal issues, and from emotional to logical viewpoints – as do artists' trajectories.

In a rather improbable combination, the Adding Subtractions exhibition brings together works of diverse media, concepts and aesthetics, following a collage-like perspective, proposing a revisitation of South African contemporary art production.
– (Fordsburg Artists Studios) 

Twelve Phases of Orange (2002) was selected for this exhibition.

DESIGN INDABA EXPO FILM FESTIVAL

Cape Town International Convention Centre, South Africa

27 February – 1 March

2009

The Design Indaba Expo annually showcases a selection of South African advertising, architecture, craft, décor, film, fashion, graphic design, interior design, jewellery, furniture, industrial design, new media, publishing and product design – all under one roof. The film exhibition showcases South African short films, music videos and animation. Selected by a curation team, films may not exceed 12 minutes in length. Thorough research is done and various filmmakers are approached and invited to submit their film. The festival is open to viewing by Design Indaba Expo visitors and it is screened in between fashion shows, which take place around the Fashion Ramp on the Expo floor.
(www.designindaba.co.za) (2009)

3SAI: A Rite of Passage (2008) was officially selected for this film festival.

NAVIGATING THE BOOKSCAPE: ARTISTS BOOKS AND THE DIGITAL INTERFACE (2)

FADA Gallery, University of Johannesburg, South Africa

5 – 13 October

2006

Curator David Paton invited five artists to produce a work for a show of traditional and contemporary 'artists books' to "... open up questions around what the digital interface can bring to the conventions of the codex." – (Robyn Sassen). The exhibition featured an interactive work, The Lost Men Project (Grahamstown) (2006) – a digital program running on a computer concealed within a custom-designed pedestal supporting a touch sensitive monitor and headphones. A soundtrack entices the viewer to touch the screen depicting a photographic close-up of the artist’s skin bruised with embossed names. Each successive touch induces a change of image as the names slowly disappear.

More information

NAVIGATING THE BOOKSCAPE: ARTISTS BOOKS AND THE DIGITAL INTERFACE (1)

Aardklop Arts Festival, Potchefstroom, South Africa

25 – 30 September

2006

Curator David Paton invited five artists to produce a work for a show of traditional and contemporary 'artists books' to "... open up questions around what the digital interface can bring to the conventions of the codex." – (Robyn Sassen). The exhibition featured an interactive work, The Lost Men Project (Grahamstown) (2006) – a digital program running on a computer concealed within a custom-designed pedestal supporting a touch sensitive monitor and headphones. A soundtrack entices the viewer to touch the screen depicting a photographic close-up of the artist’s skin bruised with embossed names. Each successive touch induces a change of image as the names slowly disappear.

Catalogue PDF

Review by Christo Doherty

BAG FACTORY ARTISTS

UNISA Art Gallery, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa

6 July – 26 August

2005

A group show of permanent artists from Fordsburg Artist’s Studios, also known as The Bag Factory. Two editioned photographs and a documentary from The Lost Men Grahamstown (2004) were shown.

WALDSEE, 1944

Hebrew Union College Museum, New York, USA

July

2005

The 2B foundation and the Alma on Dobbin Foundation invited selected artists to participate in this touring exhibition with a postcard size work that reflected on these events of 60 years ago. The show featured The Lost Men Grahamstown I (2004).

“... The letters of Holocaust victims are today preserved in archives. The postcards, letters and scraps of paper are unique documents of forced labour and deportation. They were written in the shadow of death, in most cases in the last moments of their authors’ lives. (Waldsee 1944 catalogue). In the summer of 1944, recently deported persons sent postcards to Budapest from a certain place called Waldsee. The postcards were handed to the Jewish Council in Budapest to be distributed by them to the addressees. The text of the postcards would read: ”I am doing fine, I am working.” or ”I have arrived safely. I have got work in my occupation.” or ”We are doing fine. Follow us here!”  It was later discovered that the postcards came from Auschwitz...” (Hedwig Turai)

Waldsee 1944 also toured to Florida Holocaust Museum, Florida, USA; St. Petersburg, Russia (Sept – Dec 2006); Hibel Museum, FAU-Jupiter, Florida, USA (Jan – March 2007); Ben Uri Gallery, London, UK (Autumn 2007); and Alper JCC, Miami, Florida, USA (April – June 2008).

WALDSEE, 1944

Collegium Hungaricum, Berlin, Germany

May

2005

The 2B foundation and the Alma on Dobbin Foundation invited selected artists to participate in this touring exhibition with a postcard size work that reflected on these events of 60 years ago. The show featured The Lost Men Grahamstown I (2004).

“... The letters of Holocaust victims are today preserved in archives. The postcards, letters and scraps of paper are unique documents of forced labour and deportation. They were written in the shadow of death, in most cases in the last moments of their authors’ lives. (Waldsee 1944 catalogue). In the summer of 1944, recently deported persons sent postcards to Budapest from a certain place called Waldsee. The postcards were handed to the Jewish Council in Budapest to be distributed by them to the addressees. The text of the postcards would read: ”I am doing fine, I am working.” or ”I have arrived safely. I have got work in my occupation.” or ”We are doing fine. Follow us here!”  It was later discovered that the postcards came from Auschwitz...” (Hedwig Turai)

Waldsee 1944 also toured to Florida Holocaust Museum, Florida, USA; St. Petersburg, Russia (Sept – Dec 2006); Hibel Museum, FAU-Jupiter, Florida, USA (Jan – March 2007); Ben Uri Gallery, London, UK (Autumn 2007); and Alper JCC, Miami, Florida, USA (April – June 2008).

NEW BEGINNINGS: THE BEST OF THE STANDARD BANK CORPORATE ART COLLECTION

Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

4 March – 9 April

2005

This was a comprehensive exhibition of works from the Standard Bank Corporate Collection to celebrate the opening of the newly renovated Standard Bank Gallery in Johannesburg. Air on the Skin (2002) (Standard Bank Collection) was included in this exhibition.

MAKING WAVES: A SELECTION OF WORKS FROM THE SABC ART COLLECTION

Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa

3 November 2004 – 8 March

2005

This was the second exhibition of artworks from the SABC art collection, primarily exhibiting works acquired since 1996. The show included Vault of Breath (2000) and was curated by Koulla Xinisteris and Graham Neame. ‘Making Waves’ was also shown at Iziko Good Hope Gallery at the Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town from September 6 to October 28, 2007 as well as The Grahamstown and Military Galleries, and The Albany History Museum from June 29 to July 8, during the 2006 Grahamstown National Arts Festival.

WALDSEE, 1944

2B Galéria, Budapest, Hungary

April

2004

The 2B foundation and the Alma on Dobbin Foundation invited selected artists to participate in this touring exhibition with a postcard size work that reflected on these events of 60 years ago. The show featured The Lost Men Grahamstown I (2004).

“... The letters of Holocaust victims are today preserved in archives. The postcards, letters and scraps of paper are unique documents of forced labour and deportation. They were written in the shadow of death, in most cases in the last moments of their authors’ lives. (Waldsee 1944 catalogue). In the summer of 1944, recently deported persons sent postcards to Budapest from a certain place called Waldsee. The postcards were handed to the Jewish Council in Budapest to be distributed by them to the addressees. The text of the postcards would read: ”I am doing fine, I am working.” or ”I have arrived safely. I have got work in my occupation.” or ”We are doing fine. Follow us here!”  It was later discovered that the postcards came from Auschwitz...” (Hedwig Turai)

Waldsee 1944 also toured to Florida Holocaust Museum, Florida, USA; St. Petersburg, Russia (Sept – Dec 2006); Hibel Museum, FAU-Jupiter, Florida, USA (Jan – March 2007); Ben Uri Gallery, London, UK (Autumn 2007); and Alper JCC, Miami, Florida, USA (April – June 2008).

THE AMPERSAND FOUNDATION

Warren Siebrits Modern and Contemporary Art, Johannesburg, South Africa

13 November – 13 December

2003

The Ampersand Foundation is a non-profit, equal-opportunity Trust promoting the fine arts in South Africa. The foundation recognises and rewards excellence and encourages potential in the arts by granting fellowships to artists. This fellowship includes a residency programme in New York, the first of which was awarded to Paul Emmanuel in March 1997. This was the second exhibition of works by Ampersand Foundation Fellows and included The Lost Men I (2003)

SASOL WAX IN ART COMPETITION

SASOL WAM! Festival, Sasolburg, South Africa

September

2002

A group show, curated by Lesley Cohn, of selected artworks submitted nationally for the competition. Sasol Corporation – the competition sponsor – is the largest producer of wax in the world and the competition was unique in that it challenged South African artists to create work in or through wax. The two categories: 'Wax as the medium' and 'Wax as part of the process' constituted the criteria by which works were judged. Air on the Skin (2002) – a one-off work – won the 'Wax as the medium' category. This 70 x 3 040 mm triptych was created by layering black shoe polish over pva-treated paper. The images were then scratched into this surface with a fine blade, gradually working from dark to light.

Article by Kathryn Smith, Art South Africa magazine

THE BIG BAG SHOW

Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

27 January – 17 February

2001

A group exhibition and auction of donated works by permanent artists from Fordsburg Artist's Studios (a.k.a. The Bag Factory) was held to raise funds for this artists'‘ collective. An impression from the Phone-sense (1998) edition was auctioned and Vault of Breath (2000) was included in the exhibition, courtesy of the SABC Art Collection.

Article by Bettie Lampbrecht, Beeld newspaper

POSTCARDS FROM SOUTH AFRICA

Axis Gallery, New York, USA

10 September – 16 December

1998

This was a group show of postcard-sized artworks from South Africa curated by Lisa Brittan and Gary Van Wyk.

GRAFIK – SYDAFRIKA

Grafiska Sällskapets Galleri, Stockholm, Sweden

28 November – 16 December

1998

This group exhibition, curated by Mattias Fagerholm, featured work by several Swedish printmaking artists, as well as an impression from the artist's own Sleep Series IV (1995).

BAG FACTORY GROUP EXHIBITION

Mexican Embassy, Pretoria, South Africa

1997

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ARTISTS BOOKS IN THE GINSBERG COLLECTION

Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa

1996

1996 is the Centenary of the death of William Morris (1834-1896). Over one hundred years after Morris 'defined' the fine press book, his words still hold true: f I were asked to say what is at once the most important production of Art and the thing most to be longed for, I should answer, ‘a beautiful house’; and if I were further asked to name the production next in importance and thing next to be longed for, I should answer, ‘a beautiful book’. This exhibition is curated in the form of a book. The visitor begins a reading of the show with a 'preface' which introduces some parameters and issues within the book arts. It then develops through a number of chapters through which the artist's book is decoded and revealed. Many of my chapters have been derived from Johanna Drucker’s chapter headings in her seminal book The Century of Artists' Books (1995). Emmanuel's student work Nomina Sunt Numina (1993) was selected for this exhibition. 

As one moves through the 'spine' of the exhibition, bindings and books which use the spine and gutter as important aspects of their content are shown. The exhibition ends with an 'endnote' in which questions about the nature of Artists' Books are asked and future thematic and material possibilities within the field postulated. Thus the visitor reads the book by moving through the exhibition. Curated by Jack M. Ginsberg and David M. Paton. (courtesy South African Artists Books website)

More information

THE FIRST FOUR YEARS

The Civic Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

1995

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PRINT – EXCHANGE

Co-operation printmaking project between Flanders and South Africa

1995

Cooperation Project between Flanders and South Africa. This set of playing cards, reproductions of original graphic prints made by Flemish and South African Artists, is the result of the cooperation between the Flemish Centre for Graphics "Frans Masereel" from Kasterlee, the Artist Proof Studio from Johannesburg, and the Hard Ground Printmakers from Capetown." Two complete packs of playing cards in clear plastic container. One pack of these has bibliographic details of each artist on the back of each card and the other pack has the same image on the back of each card. In addition, there is a special edition where the cards have been pasted onto four black accordion folded booklets, all of which are housed in a perspex container. Clubs and Diamonds contain images from Flanders. Hearts contain images from the Artist Proof Studio from Johannesburg. Spades contain images from the Hard Ground Printmakers from Capetown. The South African artists (Hearts and Spades) are indexed hereunder. In a black drop-back box by Peter Carstens with antique marbling. (courtesy South African Artists Books website)

OPEN BITE: A NEW LOOK AT INTAGLIO PRINTMAKING

Civic Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

1994

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